Asceticism

I would like to offer a few words of advice to beginners who are usually very enthusiastic--and so they should be--so that they do not harm themselves abruptly from non-discerning asceticism. They are often like a torrent, which abruptly pours out all of its waters all at once and then does not have even one drop for himself or a passerby. Apart from this, whatever plant has sprouted up on its shores will also dry out. It is also possible that the beginner will lose his patience and gripe in the event that his health is undermined. That is why we should always look for the greatest spiritual profit and struggle with discernment.

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Our Statement of Faith: The Nicene Creed Explained (Part VI)

Man is created by the Lord for life, and human thought cannot reconcile itself to the thought of death. Death was a consequence of the first man's sin, for as Saint Paul says sin came into the world through one man and death through sin (Romans 5:12). As a consequence of his sinful disobedience to God, man deprived himself of Paradise and knew death. The Fall deformed man's inner, spiritual nature, as well as the entire visible world. The accord between freedom and Divine Grace was destroyed, an accord through which man was directly called to deification (theosis). This break was so forceful that man could no longer return to this previous condition by his own power.

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Our Statement of Faith: The Nicene Creed Explained (Part V)

Man becomes a child of the Church through the Mystery (Sacrament) of Holy Baptism. Holy Baptism is the door to Christianity, the beginning of life in God. Baptism restores the image of God in man and bestows the saving power of Christ's redemption feat on him. Through Baptism the Christian receives access to all the Holy Mysteries (Sacraments) and acts of grace of the Church, which lead him to deification (theosis).

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The Synaxis (Assembly) of the Twelve Holy Apostles

The names of the Twelve Holy Apostles are these: Simon, who was called Peter, and his brother Andrew, the First-called; James the son of Zebedee, and his brother John, who was also the Evangelist and Theologian; Philip, and Bartholomew (see also June 11th); Thomas, and Matthew the publican, who was also called Levi and was an Evangelist; James the son of Alphaeus, and Jude (also called Labbaeus, and surnamed Thaddaeus), the brother of James, the Brother of God; Simon the Cananite ("the Zealot"), and Matthias, who was elected to fill the place of Judas the traitor (see August 9th).

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The Holy Feast Day of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul

The divinely blessed Peter was from Bethsaida of Galilee. He was the son of Jonas and the brother of Saint Andrew the First-called. He was a fisherman by trade, unlearned and poor, and was called Simon; later he was renamed Peter by the Lord Jesus Christ Himself, Who looked at him and said, "Thou art Simon the son of Jonas; thou shalt be called Cephas (which is by interpretation, Peter)" (St. John 1:42).

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Our Statement of Faith: The Nicene Creed Explained (Part III)

The Holy Orthodox Church confesses the Holy Spirit as the True God, the Third Person (Hypostasis) of the Holy, Consubstantial, Life-Giving and Indivisible Trinity. The Church confirmed her hope and faith in the Holy Spirit as God in the definition of the Second Ecumenical Council (Constantinople, 381 AD), which was convened to condemn, among other things, the heresy of Macedonius who denied the divinity of the Holy Spirit. This definition entered into the Creed as the eighth article.

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Our Statement of Faith: The Nicene Creed Explained (Part II)

The Holy Fathers of the Church included in the Creed the most important truths of the faith taught in the Gospels. Here, in the first and second verses of the Creed, they stated the dogmatic truths about God's Essence and the Creation of the world. Through Divine Revelation, the Holy Church teaches us to believe in the One God (Deut. 6:4; 1 Tim. 1:17) in Three Persons, Who in the Holy Scripture are called God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit (St. Matthew 28:19).

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Our Statement of Faith: The Nicene Creed Explained

Orthodox Christian are constantly asked and challenged as to what they believe by the heterodox Christians. We believe that the Holy Orthodox Christian Church is the authentic Church of Christ, the continuation of the early Church, the New Testament Church, the Church of the Ecumenical Councils, the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. For the Orthodox Christian, God is the object of our faith, first and foremost, and nothing supersedes this, as is clear in our statement of faith, the historic Nicene Creed, the Symbol of faith.

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