The Woman in the Twelfth Chapter of the Apocalypse (Revelation) of Saint John (Part II)

Therefore, Saint Methodios believes that the Woman who has brought forth continues to bring forth a male child, the Logos/Word, in the hearts of the faithful; and this same Woman went forth into the desert undefiled and unharmed by the wrath of the beast. This Woman is our Mother, the Church. He then explains that the seven heads of the dragon, the devil, signify the seven vices.

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The Woman in the Twelfth Chapter of the Apocalypse (Revelation) of Saint John

A most difficult passage in a difficult book, the Apocalypse of Saint John (Revelation): "And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars. And she being with child cried, travailing in birth, and pained to be delivered" (Revelation 12:1-2). The word "woman" was given a collective meaning by most ancient writers as describing the people of God by a female figure.

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The Holy Theotokos and the Church

The Holy Virgin Mary is more than an example of piety. She is more than a Saint. She is All-Holy, Ever-Virgin and Mother of God. She is the Church's Greatest Theologian. She is the one human--body and soul resurrected, united and complete--and now deified person who is "more honorable than the Cherubim and beyond compare more glorious than the Seraphim. In her the whole mystery of the Divine economy is personified, writes Saint John of Damascus (c. 676-750).

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Dogma and Mystery

It is essential to make a distinction between dogma and mystery. The mystery of the Holy Trinity is experienced, to the extent that this is possible, by the glorified human being and is different from the dogma, which is the rational formulation concerning the mystery of the Holy Trinity or the revelation. This distinction is fundamental to Orthodox theology: "God is always a mystery. The mystery of the Holy Trinity must be separated from the dogma of the Holy Trinity. The dogma is not the same as the mystery.

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On God-Created Inequality (Part IV)

This Parable further confirms that God is impartially merciful to all, for some gift is given to every created man. It is true that some are given more and some less, but this in no way changes the situation, because God seeks more from him to whom much has been given, and less of him to whom little has been given. Enough, though, is given to everyone for his or her salvation, and to help in the salvation of others.

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On God-Created Inequality (Part III)

The wicked and faithless complain, for example, when God takes their children from them: "See," they cry, "how He mercilessly takes our children before their time!" On what basis are they yours? Were they not His before you called them yours? And how before their time? Does not He who created time know when their right time has come? Not a single householder on earth waits until his entire forest has grown to maturity, and only then cuts it down, but he cuts it, old or young, as he needs it--both that which has been growing a long time and that which has just sprouted--to put to use in his house.

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