Apocalypse (The Book of Revelation) Part II

A new translation always begs the question: Why another? Clearly, a translation of the Apocalypse based solely upon the living text of the Eastern Orthodox Church is one important answer. Another is the larger question of the interpretation and meaning of Scripture. In the West, this has become idiosyncratic, largely derived from the King James Version, the Revised Standard Version, and the New Revised Edition, and caught up in the debates regarding the "purity" of textual traditions and the inclusion of alternative readings.

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Prayer and the Angels

This discourse concerning prayer is the most important, brethren, for truly this is the task entrusted to us by God, and the crown of all else. Prayer is conversation directly with God, being always with God, having one's soul united with Him  and one's inseparable, as David says: "My soul clings to You," (Psalm 62:9); and "My soul thirsts for You" (Psalm 62:3); "As the deer longs for the springs of water, so my soul longs for You, O God" (Psalm 121:1); "I will love You, O God my strength" (Psalm 16:2); and "My soul is always in Your hands" (Psalm 118:109). Furthermore, he says: "I will bless the Lord at all times; His praise will always be in my mouth" (Psalm 33:2).

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Homily on the Sunday of the Myrrh-bearing Women: On Spiritual Deadness

The Gospels have told us today about the exploits of the holy women who followed the God-Man during His earthly wanderings. They witnessed His sufferings and were present at his burial. The burial took place on Friday evening. While the Jews' wrath was pouring out like the fiery lava of Aetna not only upon the Lord, but upon all of those close to Him; while the Holy Apostles were forced to hide or observe the extraordinary events only from a distance; while only Saint John, the beloved disciple who leaned upon the breast of the Lord, feared nothing and remained always near the Lord, the secret disciple, Joseph of Arimathea, who had always concealed his heart's allegiance due to persecution from the Sanhedrin, suddenly disregards all the obstacles, hesitations, and anxiety that had bound and worried him until then, and he appears before cold, cruel Pilate to beg the body of the One Who was shamefully executed. He receives the Lord's body and buries it with reverence and honor.

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Orthodox Spirituality

The term "spiritual life", within the Orthodox context, refers to a specific reality, a tangible, comprehensive and specific way of life. It is neither a cloudy utopia nor a propless idealism, trapped inside the limits of meditation and fantasy. The spirituality of Orthodoxy involves materiality and realism, as well as mundane elements. It is the tradition; the conveyance and continuity, within the specific reality, of a way of life, an everlasting way of existence, that entered history and became earthly-mundane reality through the Incarnation of God-Logos (Word); our Lord Jesus Christ. The Christian spiritual life is inconceivable, if not based on the fact of God's Incarnation.

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