The Vision of Saint John Kronstadt (Part II)

Without warning, the Staretz (elder or geronda) turned to the north and pointed with his hand. I saw an imperial palace, around which dogs were running. Wild beasts and scorpions were roaring and charging and baring their teeth. And I saw the Tsar sitting on a throne. His face was pale and masculine. He was reciting the Jesus Prayer. Suddenly he fell like dead man. His crown fell. The wild beasts, dogs, and scorpions trampled on the anointed Sovereign. I was frightened and cried bitterly. 

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The Vision of Saint John of Kronstadt

The Holy and Righteous John of Kronstadt recalled this vision which he had in January of 1901: After evening prayers I laid down to rest a little in my dimly lit cell since I was fatigued. Hanging before the icon of the Mother of God was my lit lampada (large candle). Not more than a half-hour had passed when I heard a soft rustle. Someone touched my left shoulder, and in a tender voice said to me, "Arise servant of God John, and follow the will of God!"

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The Holy Emperor Constantine and the Empress Helena

Constantine's parents were the Emperor Constantius Chorus and Empress Helena. Chlorus had further children by another wife, but by Helena, he had only the one, Constantine. Constantine fought two great battles when he came to the throne: one against Maxentius, a tyrant in Rome, and the other against Licinius not far from Byzantium. At the battle against Maxentius, when Constantine was in great anxiety and uncertainty about his chances of success, a shining cross, surrounded by stars, appeared to him in the sky in full daylight. On the cross were written the words: 'In this sign, conquer!' ("En Touto Nika").

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The Old Testament in the Orthodox Church (Part III)

The spiritual method of interpreting the Old Testament has been in use by the Orthodox Church for centuries. The Church may, therefore, be accused of not even considering other studies (archaeological, cultural, historical, or literary studies) concerning the Old Testament. At no time in history was the opportunity so great to measure the Old Testament as it is in the present, and in the study of the Old Testament, there is certainly much that can be measured. It would be erroneous to insist that the Church was not interested in using other studies to measure the Old Testament given that the Church:

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The Old Testament in the Orthodox Church

The place of the Old Testament in the Orthodox Church is a problem 'as old as the Church itself.' The two major problems were whether the Old Testament was to be included in the Biblical Canon, and which version of the Old Testament was to be used. This 'problem' was not an issue for the authors of the New Testament, nor the Early Christian Church. In fact, the place of the Old Testament in the Church was defined by the Church from very early in the Christian centuries. The Church fought the Gnostics (heretics) and the Marcionites (heretics) vehemently against their attempts to exclude the Old Testament from the Canon, and was victorious in this endeavor.

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The Divine Ascension of Our Lord, Redeemer and God Jesus Christ (Part III)

During His life Christ answered the Scribes and Pharisees who were complaining because He received sinners and ate with them, said that this is also what the good shepherd does when he loses one sheep, he leaves the other ninety-nine in the open country and goes to the mountains to look for the lost sheep. And when he finds it he puts it on his shoulders and rejoices. Then he comes home and inviting all his friends, urges them to rejoice with him, because he has found the lost sheep (St. Luke 15:4-6).

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The Divine Ascension of Our Lord, Redeemer and God Jesus Christ (Part II)

In the Gospels we often see Christ blessing the people. A characteristic case is the blessing which He gave to the children. It says, "And He took them up in His arms, put His hands on them, and blessed them" (St. Mark 10:16). In this sense all the miracles which Christ performed have the element of blessing, but chiefly those which He did by laying His hands on the limbs of their bodies, as in the curing of Peter's mother-in-law (Saint Peter the Apostle was married) when "He touched her hand, and the fever left her" (Saint Matthew 8:15).

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